Mako Magellan Menswear

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Friday 15 October 2010

Tux redux

Dinner3.jpg Valet.jpg

Here's a look at the modern evening wear items all worn together. I have added this ensemble to the Suggested Combinations page.

The key to putting together an outfit in Blue Mars (at the time of writing) is adjusting the relative position of the garments in the clothing hierarchy, so that the inner clothing does not appear through the outer clothing. To the right is a partial screendump showing how I have arranged this outfit. The first point to note is that the jacket and trousers (marked B) are kept far apart, so that they glitch as little as possible, across the widest range of animations. There are two provisos to this, however. Shoes must be placed closer to the body than the pants, as one might expect. Secondly, the bow tie must be placed further from the body than the jacket. This is so that its wings appear to rest above the lapels. If the bow tie were made part of the shirt (which must, obviously, be placed closer to the body than the jacket) then the tie would appear to dip beneath the lapels in a very unrealistic way. That is the reason for keeping shirt and tie as separate garments, and the reason why the tie is defined as an outer garment. You may need to remember that when you go looking for it in inventory.

The spaces between the trousers and jacket are where everything else needs to go - hair, shirt, hat, gloves, etc. In this example, only my shirt and hair are there.

It certainly pays to become adept at arranging your Blue Mars clothing. This system is not just a good way to minimise glitching, it also offers greater flexibility when putting together outfits from multiple developers.

Saturday 9 October 2010

A modern take on evening wear

DJ.jpg Sidestripe_Trousers.jpg Bow_Tie.jpg Evening_Shirt.jpg

Although 'modern' refers to a look that was more prevalent fifty years ago than today, today I release an outfit in four parts: dinner jacket, trousers, bow tie and shirt. This is a look popularised in the early James Bond films: white or cream-coloured jacket, white shirt, and contrasting trousers and bow tie. All items are available in my shop in Caledonia, but you may have to look hard for the bow tie. Because of its small size it is quite hard to see, but rest assured it is there in the space below the shirt, and just to the right of the trousers.

There is huge variability in the design of dinner jackets. They can be black or white, single- or double-breasted, have 1, 2, 4, or 6 buttons, have notched, peaked or shawl lapels, be vented or unvented, and even button right-over-left as well as left-over-right. You can see from the picture above just which design decisions I took. Mine is a very simple jacket - pocketless, without buttonhole and with only two buttons, both on the breast and at the cuffs. The buttons are made from a dark polished stone. The bow tie is also simple, an unpatterned black velvet. The trousers are pleated at the front, and have a black braid side stripe running down each leg. The shirt is a close-fitting type, with black studs that match the jacket buttons.

The new clothing system in Blue Mars has made this outfit possible. In earlier days it was necessary to combine jackets, shirts and ties, but they can now be separated, which certainly allows for greater flexibility. Note that the tie can sit over the lapels of the jacket, if it has been positioned that way in the valet system.